How to Regrout a Shower

Regrouting may become necessary for shower tiles that have become discolored, grimy or moldy. Many issues with tiles, particularly older ones, involve problems that make them difficult to clean or treat even with strong commercial cleaners. If and when this happens, it may be time for regrouting shower tile. Here are the steps you should take:

Make a physical inspection before regrouting shower tile

Regrouting the shower tiles will prevent further damage, so start by inspecting what types of problems exist. This will give you an idea about the extent of the repair that needs to be done and what types of materials you need to use.

Remove damaged caulk and shower tile grout

Start repair work by removing all the old, damaged and dirty portions using a good razor scraper. If mold and mildew are present, clean the surface first using a mildew and mold remover or bleach diluted in water. Carefully scrape as much of the old grout and caulking as possible to prepare the surface. The ideal depth should be 1/8th inch deep at least. Do not apply new grouting onto a shallow surface since this will not adhere to the old material.

Once done, wipe off the surface with a clean, damp cloth to remove any leftover debris. Sweep up the chunks and tiny pieces or use a vacuum. If old grout proves stubborn, spraying isopropyl alcohol will help scrape it off. It would also help to use a chisel or grout saw to loosen hardened grout. Before finishing, check the grouting lines for any loose pieces and remove these.

If there are damaged tiles, remove the pieces and replace them before starting the regrouting job.

To regrout shower tiles successfully, always work on dry surface. Removing wet surfaces could make the environment conducive to growth of mildew and mold. It is always better to call in the professionals, like the Bathroom Surgeon, to get the job done properly.

Apply shower tile grout

Regrouting shower tile can be relatively quick and easy.

Decide on the grout color prior to application so it matches or complements the tiles. Grouting material is either dry or pre-mixed; simply follow directions on how to mix and apply. The unsanded grout variety is a good choice for this type of application due to the small gap spaces between tiles.

Although most types of grouting material will work, you may also try a latex-based product which is less prone to cracking and is more resistant to water and moisture. Spread the material at an angle using a float. Press firmly over empty spaces along the lines between tiles until these are full and remove any excess. Allow the new material to set for about 10 minutes or so then use a wet sponge to wipe the tile surface clean. Allow the new grouting to harden for 3 to 4 days before using the area.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *